Little Bits and Pieces

I heard the rabbi say, “Stop arguing on facebook.” I took him seriously.

I have a self-imposed ban in place to avoid reading blogs where the main purpose of the blog post is to sensationalize issues and thereby draw a great amount of attention to the author. Fame is one of those things that few are able to manage without a great deal of sin. It does things, creeps up on us slowly, and before we know it, we think more highly of ourselves than we should. The need to be greater and have power over others is a temptation few can pass up.

When an author adores the sight of his/her own words, rather than displaying a concern for the people s/he’s reaching with the words, it’s usually difficult for me to cut through all the crap to find a purpose in the post. The sharpness of his/her tongue (or in this case, fingers) and the little bits and pieces s/he leaves in place of a person, takes my breath away and leaves me speechless. What ensues, after the multi-paragraph rant, is usually a flood of comments from people who get caught up in the frenzy and lose their way and forget to love their neighbor. And I feel defeated and embarrassed, and even angry for letting my eyes and mind participate.

I heard the rabbi say, “Love your neighbor.” That is proving to be a more difficult than I imagined. I took Him seriously.

What She Said…

Today I found my way through the clutter of the interwebs and found a happy place:
Sarah Bessey…the intersection of a spirit filled life

She said this:  In which the doorbell is ringing

It feels sometimes like it would be simpler to live in a Christian ghetto, to shut the door, build a fence, keep the big, bad, scary world at bay, especially when it comes to my tinies. And sometimes we can buy into the idea that ministry is for the professionals, for somewhere other than here, right where we are in our walking-around life, like the Gospel doesn’t have hands and feet and voices, right here, right now, in our own neighbourhoods, in big ways and small ways.

Then she said this:  In which you are loved and you are free

Stand up, shake the dust from your feet if you need to, and look outside, it’s beautiful, isn’t it? There are a lot of us here, waiting for you, in the open air. We’ve been here all along, don’t you know? We’ve been ministering, preaching, praying, teaching, loving, mothering, caring, singing, walking each other home. It’s glorious and messy, far away from the rules and the limitations, the barriers and restrictive religion. But look, here, we, the people of God, we are here with you, we are a family, we’re your family, we’ve been waiting for you. We have a big, gorgeous tent and every one is welcome.

And lastly, my favorite thing she said:  In which I am done fighting for a seat at the table

I’m done fighting for a seat at that table.

The one filled with white men, all reading the same books, spouting the same talking points, quoting each other back and forth. It’s the table where the men – a small, select, vocal group in no way representative of men in the Church overall – sit around and discuss who is in and who is out, who is right (usually them) and who is wrong (every one else) and, a favourite topic, whether women should be allowed to write or teach or preach or even read Scripture aloud, what women should be saying and doing, how marriages should look, how children should be raised, how everyone else should live their lives in holiness.

Me? I am simply getting on with the business of the Kingdom.

Enjoy your table, gentlemen.

 

 

 

The RC Sproul Jr. Principle of Hermeneutics

The principle is this-

“Whenever you see someone doing something really stupid in the Bible, do not say to yourself, ‘How can they be so stupid?’ Instead say to yourself, ‘How am I stupid, just like them?’”

Read the entire post here.

And here is the sermon he would have preached at his wife’s memorial service. Very inspirational.

Though it was a close call, I elected not to preach at my dear wife’s memorial service. Wasn’t sure I could get through it. But in God’s good grace I was given a second chance, the opportunity to preach to many who knew and loved her. My friends at Boerne Christian Assembly in San Antonio offered me their pulpit one February Lord’s Day, and positively encouraged me to preach on the things I had learned during Denise’s battle, and after her victory. Though it was a close call, I made it through. And in God’s grace that sermon, The Mountain of the Brilliance of Life, was recorded. I have been deeply encouraged by those who have been reading my pieces through various internet outlets about our journey, who have let me know how they have been encouraged. My prayer is that this sermon would encourage still more, that we would all remember that our heavenly Father loves us, and that Jesus will never leave nor forsake us.

 

 



 

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Cookbooks

Eat Your Books